WCR This Week

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News

Resolve First Nations issues to curtail crime

Clive Weighill

January 26, 2015
BLAKE SITTLER
PRAIRIE MESSENGER

The main factor in producing crime is "the huge marginalization of the First Nations community," says Saskatoon's police chief. Clive Weighill told a recent gathering at St. Anne's Church in Saskatoon the stereotypical story of a boy who grew up in a tough neighbourhood, who was poor and bullied. "He goes to school with no breakfast. He fails a test," Weighill went on. "He's an outsider who is finally invited in by a gang. This friendship escalates quickly to criminal activity."

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World without mothers would be inhumane – pope

January 26, 2015
CAROL GLATZ
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

Mothers are indispensable to society and the Church, showing the world what it means to generously give oneself for others, Pope Francis said. Mothers respect life and display tenderness and moral strength even in times of trouble, the pope said at his Jan. 7 general audience. Even though mothers are often "exalted" with praise and poetry, they often get very little concrete help and appreciation, he said. In his talk, the pope looked specifically at Mary's role in the Gospel accounts of Christmas. "She gives us Jesus, she shows us Jesus, she lets us see Jesus," he said.

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Charlie Hebdo journalism adds to society of disrespect

January 26, 2015
MICHAEL SWAN
THE CATHOLIC REGISTER

While nothing can ever justify cold-blooded murder, the Charlie Hebdo murders in Paris are no surprise, said Canada's most famous Catholic philosopher. Charles Taylor spoke to The Register the day after brothers Said and Chérif Kouachi invaded the offices of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo with AK47 assault rifles, killed 12 people and injured 11 others. One of the brothers is reported to have shouted "Allahu Akbar" (God is Great) and at another point in French, "The Prophet has been avenged."

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'Despiritualized' culture saps ability to face death

Fr. Kevin Belgrave

January 26, 2015
EVAN BOUDREAU
THE CATHOLIC REGISTER

Priests need to preach the Church's teachings on end-of-life issues more frequently to better spiritually prepare parishioners for the inevitable, Father Kevin Belgrave believes. "The solution to the vast majority of problems and challenges that arise at the end of life begins long before the moment of death arises," said Belgrave, an assistant professor of moral theology at Toronto's St. Augustine's Seminary. "If you attempt to deal with end-of-life issues only at the moment when death is on our door you have a person who has in no way been prepared for that moment."

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Scripture melded into melody; music ministry was born

Steve Bell

January 26, 2015
RUANE REMY
THE CATHOLIC REGISTER

Steve Bell was ready to face the music: his decade-long career as a nightclub musician was over. A little over age 30, he played in bars six nights a week, not making enough money to support his young family. He says he slipped into a deep depression and realized that, other than music, he had no employable skills. Then one night, as he lay in bed, he felt a presence, a presence he now acknowledges to be God, which provided him with a sense that he was meant to do something else. "So I quit playing, thinking that I was going to hang up my guitar and my career was over. But literally when I quit is when all of this new music came out of me," said Bell.

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Bishop tells of personal effects of 'racial divide' in the U.S.

Bishop Edward Braxton

January 26, 2015
CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

In a 19-page reflection on the "racial divide" in the United States, Bishop Edward Braxton of Belleville, Ill., who is African-American, said he twice has been the victim of what he considered to be unjust police attitudes. The episodes "made me very conscious of the fact that simply by being me, I could be the cause of suspicion and concern without doing anything wrong," Braxton wrote in a reflection issued Jan. 1. In the first episode, when Braxton was a priest, "I was simply walking down a street in an apparently all-white neighbourhood. A police car drove up beside me and the officer asked, 'What are you doing in this area? Do you live around here? Where is your car? You should not be wandering about neighbourhoods where you do not live.'

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Church groups applaud gov't decision to allow more refugees.

January 26, 2015
DEBORAH GYAPONG
CANADIAN CATHOLIC NEWS

OTTAWA – Aid groups are welcoming the federal government's Jan. 7 announcement that Canada will take in an additional 10,000 Syrian refugees and 3,000 more Iraqi refugees. But the groups hope the government will also streamline the refugee sponsorship program to make it easier and faster for churches and private charities to bring refugee families to Canada. Canada will also contribute additional humanitarian aid of $67 million, with $40 million going to Syria. "I think it's very good news," said Guy Desaulniers, emergency programs director for the Canadian Catholic Organization for Development and Peace (CCODP). "We are quite happy. I think that Canada is a good player. They did well since the beginning of the crisis in terms of humanitarian aid."

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Massive 'blanket' recounts residential school trauma

January 26, 2015
FRANK FLEGEL
PRAIRIE MESSENGER

REGINA – "The most poignant artifact for me are the braids," said Dr. Shauneen Pete, as she explained the meaning of the "Memorial Blanket" artwork set up along a wall in the University of Regina's Research and Innovation Centre Atrium. The Memorial Blanket was put together by West Coast artist and master carver Carey Newman. Residential school artifacts were collected from across Canada and placed in panels of the nine-metre-wide work. The artwork includes everything from an old door, worn-out skates, a shoe, door handles, a clock, pieces of wood, glass and photos. Old books and encyclopedias occupy slots along the bottom of the work. A slide show of photos and letters are displayed on an old table behind the blanket.

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Scarboro opens door to youth serving 1 year in mission

Paulina Gallego

January 26, 2015
EVAN BOUDREAU
THE CATHOLIC REGISTER

Scarboro Missions is seeking those with the guts and grit to answer God's call to serve as a foreign missioner on a short-term basis. "Mission is not for everyone," said Scarboro Missions Father Ron MacDonell. "It has to come from a deep conviction that you are called . . . by God, called by Jesus, to want to serve. And young people have that capacity." That is why Scarboro Missions is again accepting applications from those 21 and older who are interested in enrolling in its One-Year Missioners program. The application can be found at scarboromissions.ca and must be submitted by Feb. 16.

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Leading Quebec bishop dies suddenly

Archbishop Pierre-André Fournier

January 26, 2015
CANADIAN CATHOLIC NEWS

QUEBEC – Rimouski Archbishop Pierre-André Fournier died suddenly Jan. 10 shortly after losing consciousness and being taken to hospital by ambulance. Fournier, 71, had also been serving as president of the Assembly of Catholic Bishops of Quebec, during the province's contentious debates on euthanasia and a secular charter. The archbishop traveled to Quebec City in December for heart surgery and was in Rimouski recovering at the time of his death.

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