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From the category archives: Word Made Flesh

Word Made Flesh

Paralyzed souls hunger for healing prayer

Maria Kozakiewicz

February 13, 2012
Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
February 19, 2012

Over time, our understanding of biblical scenes changes. The dramatic scene in which four men tear the roof over Jesus' head and use ropes to let down a paralyzed man has attracted me for years.

At first, I focused on the miracle in a literal sense – here is a man unable to move, speak and function, probably twisted and emaciated, and Jesus tells him to get up, take his mat and go.

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Confession opens the path to forgiveness

Ralph Himsl

February 6, 2012
Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time
February 12, 2011

Sunday worshippers listening closely to the readings in the Liturgy of the Word for this day, will delight in the contrast between the thunder of the narrative from Leviticus in the First Reading and the compassion in the passage from Mark's Gospel, dealing as they do with a like subject.

Of the First Reading, I might want to say, as scholars do when they start to simplify, "It is clear that . . ." or, as politicians say, "Clearly, it means that . . .".

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Prayer lets us meet God, know his love

John Connelly

January 30, 2012
Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time
February 5, 2012

Prayer has always held a deep fascination for me. It is a subject that is limitless. What an amazing thing to actually be in contact with God. The God who created and sustains all things. The God who knows us, loves us and calls us by name.

What would happen if we all dedicated our lives to really learning to pray? What would happen if we created authentic schools of prayer for our young people, families and churches?

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Toss out preconceptions and hear God's word

Kathleen Giffin

January 23, 2012
Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
January 29, 2012

One characteristic of this era is the overemphasis and reliance on our own perspective and ability to understand as the means by which we determine what is right and good. It comes, I think, from the natural tendency of the brain to order data, reach conclusions and make judgments based on those conclusions.

Yet if that normal means of understanding reality is not tempered by a humility which acknowledges the limitations in our ability to grasp the fullness of truth, we can end up seriously disoriented.

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People of Nineveh repented with flair

Maria Kozakiewicz

January 16, 2012
Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
January 22, 2012

I love the readings of this Sunday. They are like three wholesome dishes that need to be tasted separately, yet they form one wonderful meal.

First, Jonah, my favourite prophet, warns the people of Nineveh of impending doom and the need for penance. He has little love for the people to whom he brings this message, but he obeys God's command.

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The roots of the feast of Mary, Mother of God

Ralph Himsl

December 26, 2011
Mary, the Mother of God
November 1, 2011

I have a lament of sorts: with the investment that society has made in the formal education given me, supplemented by decades of experience, travel, mistakes, reading, study and dare I say it, thinking (?), it grieves me that I should know so little.

I see for example, the note in my Sunday Missal that on Jan. 1, we observe the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God on this World Day of Prayer for Peace.

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Use your time, talent, treasure for Jesus

John Connelly

December 19, 2011
Christmas
December 25, 2011

Imagine if Jesus were born anew in this world today. Imagine God being a baby in our midst. Imagine the Word Made Flesh here and now. Imagine the greatest light of human history shining in the darkness of our times.

Our world today has many similarities to the time when Jesus was born. Oppression. Fear. Spiritual darkness.

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God will answer prayers in his own way

Kathleen Giffin

December 12, 2011
Fourth Sunday in Advent
December 18, 2011

There is a pink pencil in the pen holder on my husband's desk. It is 23 years old now, and holds special significance to us because it is the last of those handed out to our friends on the occasion of the birth of our second child.

The days and weeks after her birth were a difficult time for us, for she was diagnosed with a heart defect and Down Syndrome the day she was born. Airlifted to the city, medical interventions, developmental supports, more hospitalizations all followed in the succeeding months.

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Mary's spirit rejoices in God her Saviour

Maria Kozakiewicz

December 5, 2011
Third Sunday in Advent
December 11, 2011

There are few words of Mary, mother of God, preserved in Scripture. She is the quietest of biblical women and although she is Jesus' first and the longest-serving disciple and also the one who stood by him under the cross, we hardly hear her voice.

There is the simple question she asks the angel Gabriel: "How shall this be, since I have no husband?" and then comes her consent: "Behold, I am the handmaiden of the Lord; let it be done to me according to your word."

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Celebrate the virtue of each Advent week

Ralph Himsl

November 28, 2011
Second Sunday in Advent
December 4,2011

Some traditions assign particular, how shall I say – virtues to each Sunday in Advent: hope, peace, joy, love for each of the first to the fourth respectively.

Memory tells me that we mark the Third Sunday of Advent as Gaudete Sunday, quite in line with the tradition. As Catholics, we have a leaning toward historical roots that prefer Latin for an idea when we wish to assign it a special elegance. So we refer to the Third Sunday of Advent as Gaudete Sunday, always with the explanation, "Gaudete means rejoice".

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