Columns

From the category archives: Opinion

Opinion

Pray with the heart of Jesus for renewal

John Connelly

 

September 19, 2011
26th Sunday in Ordinary Time
September 25, 2011

In this week's Gospel Jesus says to the chief priests and elders of the people, "Tax collectors and prostitutes are entering the kingdom of heaven before you" (Matthew 21.31).

This was a shocking thing to say to the devout religious people of his day. Imagine Jesus telling these leaders that the people they considered the dregs of society were getting into the kingdom of heaven before them.

Read the rest of entry »

Asking the right questions produces an ethical answer

Bob McKeon

September 19, 2011

Each year, the Catholic Church in Japan observes the days from Aug. 6 to 15 as an annual celebration of Ten Days for Peace marking the anniversaries of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the end of the Second World War.

Because of their experience of the horrors of nuclear warfare, the Japanese Church sees this time as a special time to call for prayers and actions for peace. The celebration this year was coloured by the overwhelming experience of the disastrous March 11 earthquake, tsunami and subsequent nuclear reactor meltdowns.

Read the rest of entry »

Look behind the masks and find we are one

Lasha Morningstar

September 19, 2011

His hand ruffled Kimo's soft grey wavey hair.

"First time in years that I've touched anyone."

He raised his street-worn face, looked into my eyes and said, "I always had a dog at home. But that was a long time ago."

Read the rest of entry »

World Youth Day holds promise of Catholic Springtime

WCR Logo

September 12, 2011

As odd as it may seem, the Catholic Church is a hidden movement in history. A Church of more than a billion people cannot be hidden, can it? Yet, the media coverage of World Youth Day - not just last month's version in Spain, but consistently over the years - has curiously avoided the reason for such gatherings.

If two million people, mainly young, from around the world were to gather for any other reason than to give glory to Jesus Christ, it would naturally excite extensive and probing news coverage. It would be recognized that something major is afoot. However, the WYD media coverage largely focused on peripheral issues, such as the cost of the event and the relatively small number who protested against it.

Read the rest of entry »

Sacred fire fuels all of life, infuses saint and sinner alike

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

September 12, 2011

See the wise and wicked ones, who feed upon life's sacred fire. That's a lyric from a song by Gordon Lightfoot that tries to interpret the struggle going on in the heart of Miguel de Cervantes' mythical hero, Don Quixote. Goodness separates him from the world, even as he understands that wickedness has the same source.

There's perplexing irony in this: Both the wise and wicked, saints and sinners, feed off the same, sacred source. The energy that fuels the dedicated selflessness of the saint who dies for the poor also fires the irresponsible acting-out of the movie star who proudly boasts of thousands of sexual conquests. Both feed off the same energy which, in the end, is sacred.

Read the rest of entry »

God's point of view can be life changing

Kathleen Giffin

September 12, 2011
25th Sunday in Ordinary Time
September 18, 2011

There are singular events in every person's life that serve as both watersheds and points of reference in the years that follow. One such event for me was the birth of my daughter Ange. On the day she was born she was diagnosed with both a congenital heart defect and Down Syndrome.

My response, in the succeeding days and weeks, exposed the best and the worst in me. The best was that I did everything that I could to make sure that she was loved, nurtured and received the best medical care and early intervention. The worst was what I thought and felt about this event that had "happened to me."

Read the rest of entry »

Listen always for the tiny whispering sound

Fr. Robert Barron

September 12, 2011

I have long loved the stories in the first book of Kings dealing with the prophet Elijah. His name tells us all we need to know about him. "Elijah" is the Anglicization of the Hebrew Eliyahu, which means, "Yahweh is God."

People can be named from what they worship, what they hold to be of highest value. Thus, someone who values her work above all is a "company woman;" one who prizes his family above all is a "family man;" someone who seeks pleasure as his highest good is a "good-time Charlie," etc.

Read the rest of entry »

Christians condemn risky global warming

Joe Gunn

September 12, 2011

Global warming has been named as the most serious crisis of our time.

The highest levels of the Catholic Church have asked for our understanding - and action. As long ago as 1998, the bishops of Alberta wrote a pastoral letter entitled, Celebrate Life: Care for Creation.

Read the rest of entry »

Passport to Paradise demands sharing Jesus' death and resurrection

WCR Logo

September 5, 2011

There is the sin of presumption — the belief that death will surely take me to my rightful place in paradise. There is also a philosophy of presumption — the belief that everyone has a right to eternal life unless they do something drastically bad to blow it.

However, there is no right to eternal life. As sinful creatures, there is no natural way we can enter into paradise because entering paradise means sharing in the life of the Trinity. God would be denying his own nature if he admitted to Trinitarian life any creature who was not permeated with eternal life.

Read the rest of entry »

Diligent prayers nurture a deep bond with God

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi

September 5, 2011

Do we ever really understand or master prayer? Yes and no. When we try to pray, sometimes we walk on water and sometimes we sink like a stone. Sometimes we have a deep sense of God's reality and sometimes we can't even imagine that God exists.

Sometimes we have deep feelings about God's goodness and love and sometimes we feel only boredom and distraction. Sometimes our eyes fill with tears and sometimes they wander furtively to our wrist-watches to see how much time we still need to spend in prayer. Sometimes we would like to stay in our prayer place forever and sometimes we wonder why we even showed up.

Read the rest of entry »