Columns

Guilty bystanders can be saved by repentance

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April 4, 2016

St. Peter's speech on Pentecost to "men of Judea and all who dwell in Jerusalem" is one of the most dramatic moments in the Acts of the Apostles (2.14-36). In the speech, Peter directly accuses his hearers of crucifying Jesus and then proclaims that God "raised him up." Hearing his speech, the men "were cut to the heart" and asked Peter how they could overcome their sin. "Repent and be baptized everyone of you in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins," Peter replied. That day, about 3,000 souls were baptized (2.37-41).

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Monthly column gives birth to 'small things'

Dr. Gerry Turcotte
April 4, 2016

One of the most unexpected joys of coming to St. Mary's University in Calgary was the opportunity to write this column. While it is a most modest affair, I confess to enjoying the process and discipline of writing a monthly reflection, and especially value the opportunity to discourse at will on whatever subject happens to take my fancy. As readers of the column will know, often that interest revolves around activities undertaken by my university.

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Will compassion for refugees open our hearts to all in need?

Bob McKeon
April 4, 2016

The desperate situation of many refugees has been in the media now for several months. The numbers are overwhelming. The image of the body of a three-year-old boy on a Mediterranean beach caught people's hearts and spirits around the world. Supported by widespread public concern, the newly-elected Liberal federal government acted quickly on its campaign promise, expediting refugee processing times, and rapidly increased the number of Syrian refugees arriving in Canada.

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Brutal persecution of Christians needs potent response

Douglas Roche
April 4, 2016

How should we respond to the persecution of Christians and other religious minorities now going on in the Middle East and Africa before our very eyes? One thing I know for certain: silence is not the answer. Matthew Fisher, a veteran Canadian correspondent, recently reported that the Islamic State of Iraq and Levant (ISIL) "is hell-bent on exterminating ancient Christian communities across the Middle East."

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Folly of the cross provides the hope for Church and society

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March 21, 2016

The cross is not only the toughest aspect of the Christian faith to accept, but also the most important. North American Christians, living in the most affluent time in history, may want to downplay the cross and hurry on to the resurrection. With the resurrection, those uncomfortable nails are no longer driven through the hands and feet, to say nothing of having to endure that scratchy crown of thorns. With the resurrection, one might even enjoy a margarita on the beach, if not a piece of fish.

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Dying process calibrated to bring union with Spirit

Fr. Ron Rolheiser, omi
March 21, 2016

In a deeply insightful book, The Grace of Dying, Kathleen Dowling Singh shares insights she has gleaned as a health professional from being present to hundreds of people while they are dying. Among other things, she suggests the dying process "is exquisitely calibrated to automatically produce union with Spirit."

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Fresh eyes, ears aid in renewal of faith

Lydia Cristini
March 21, 2016
Resurrection of the Lord
March 27, 2016

The resurrection: the most important event in human history. While this is true, it is also true that Christians talk about the resurrection a lot. We talk about it so much, in fact, that for some people, some of the time, it becomes ordinary or routine. "For our sake he was crucified under Pontius Pilate, he suffered death and was buried, and rose again on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures." Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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Limiting physicians' conscience rights would have dire implications

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March 21, 2016

Physicians have a right to refuse to participate in assisted suicide, but they should have no right to refuse to refer a patient who wants assistance in dying to another physician who will help that patient. That was one central conclusion in the report of the parliamentary committee on physician-assisted dying issued last month. In short, a physician should have a right to be true to his or her conscience on matters of life and death, but has a responsibility to help every patient who wants to exercise his or her supposed right to receive help in dying.

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Easter more than a reason to make merry

Lasha Morningstar
March 21, 2016

The art history prof clicked the remote and a new slide flooded the screen. As always, my heart gasped, but not as much as it did the first time I saw the Pietà. The professor related how a friend had told her that when she saw Michelangelo's poignant Carrara marble statue of Mary cradling her son Jesus' broken body in St. Peter's Basilica, she burst into tears. I so understand that.

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Receiving God's mercy, we pass it to others

Kathleen Giffin
March 21, 2016
Divine Mercy Sunday
April 3, 2016

The Second Sunday of Easter is a special day for all Catholics; in this Jubilee Year of Mercy we celebrate Divine Mercy Sunday. We have not long had this feast on our Church calendar; in 2000, our most recent year of jubilee, Pope John Paul II proclaimed this to be Divine Mercy Sunday. This jubilee year, it carries a greater significance for we celebrate it in the midst of a year set apart for us to reflect deeply on God's call to mercy and for us to become signs of mercy to the world.

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